Healing Journeys Have Ups and Downs

Neuroception, our perception of threat and safety, is an unconscious process

Building strength and resilience

What is the role of our inner critic?

What does this have to do with healing?

As we heal our trauma and become an emotionally regulated adult, we feel safer to leave old protective mechanisms behind.

We develop a kind, connected relationship with our younger self. We are on our own side. The three or eight or fifteen year old begins to experience that they are no longer alone. There is a safe adult here now. They can let go and be taken care of. They no longer need to hang on to protecting themselves with the strategies they developed as a child.

These mechanisms are driven by the primitive brain in the unconscious perception of threat. We have to consistently experience safety in our nervous system and to let go of childhood protective strategies.

We cultivate a felt sense that it is safe to relax through grounding and orienting practices. We practice being on our own side with kindness and self-compassion. Clenched teeth, holding our breath, shoulders up around our ears or a tight gut are signals from the nervous system. We pay attention and take a deep breath, stand up and shake, or look into catastrophic thoughts.

A regression into old survival patterns can be discouraging. We’ve been loving the freedom and now it feels like a setback. Keep supporting yourself on your healing journey. Some part of you is scared and reactive. We can allow that too and let them know it’s okay now. We are an adult with more resources than when we were young. It is safe to let go.

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Lynn Fraser Stillpoint

Lynn Fraser Stillpoint

Everyday join me on Zoom #645904638 passcode 397228 in-person to practice Mindfulness Rest and Inquiry Meditation 8:00am Eastern. Free. lynnfraserstillpoint.com